You can set permissions at different levels. This way you can make sure your Sitebox users can only do that you want them to do. Permissions also help you to keep Sitebox clear for your users, by allowing them to only see what they need. For this reason, it's important to understand what the permissions at different levels contain.

On this page:


Different kinds of permissions explained


Access permissions:


View and open the module itself. The content of the module is still invisible.


Add the action button 'Module Settings' to the Sitebox interface. This also gives you permission to edit permissions on module level.



Default permissions:


View websites/folders/items
Open and read SEO reports
Open and read audit logs


Add new websites/folders/items
Duplicate websites/folders/items


Edit websites/folders/items
Rollback websites/folders/items
Change accessibility
Change scheduling

Permanently delete websites/folders/items


Publish websites/folders/items
Take websites/folders/items offline


Change permissions


In order for a user to share an item on social media  they need tweet-permissions. These are set per social media account in the 'Social media' modules.



Permissions at different levels

You can set permissions at different levels. This way you can make sure your Sitebox users can only do that you want them to do. Permissions also help you to keep Sitebox clear for your users, by allowing them to only see what they need. For this reason, it's important to understand what the permissions at different levels contain.



Module level:

On this level you can set 'Access permissions' and 'Default permissions' for the entire module.


Access permissions apply to the module itself as well as 'Module Settings'. When you place a check-mark at  'View', the user will see the header containing the module on their access bar. The module itself will show up in the header menu. The user will only see modules in the header menu they have the correct permission for.


When you place a check-mark at  'module settings', the action button 'Module Settings' will be added to the Sitebox interface, but only when the user has the module for which the permissions were given is opened. Access to the module settings also gives permission to edit the module permissions at module level.



Default permissions apply to the permissions users groups have within the module. These permissions will be set by default for the entire module and everything it contains. Exceptions can be set at website/folder/item level.


Default permissions at the underlying levels always apply to the level the permissions are set at, as well as the underlying levels. This deviates from permissions set at module level, because permissions at module level only apply to underlying levels. Permissions to change permissions at module level are set through 'access permissions'.


Underlying levels:

The next overview shows you which action buttons are available to you at each level for each permission:


Levels

Website View this website and its content
  
Map View this folder and its content
 
  
Item View this item

 
    


When using an action button for which you do not have the correct permission, you will be shown the following error:



You are able to publish or delete entire websites or folders, including the content, when you have the correct permissions. Permission will be assessed at the level the changes are made.


This means that you will be able to publish the entire folder when you have publishing permissions at the folder level. Even when you don't have permission to publish the content on item level.


Permissions set with a green check-mark  or a red cross  are permissions that have been granted at a specific level and may deviate from the default permissions set at an overlaying level. Permissions set with grey check-mark  or a grey cross  are permissions that were set at an overlaying level and have automatically been copied to the current level.



Setting up permissions

When you are setting up permissions for a new user group, it's important to think about what the users within this group need to be able to see and do. You only need to set up permissions for modules the users are going to use. All permissions for new user groups are turned off by default.


Set up permissions using the following roadmap from module to item level:


  1. Open the module you wish to set up permissions for and click 'Module settings'. Grant permissions on module level.

    These permissions apply to every website, navigation trees, folders and items within the module, unless exceptions have been made on underlying levels.

    When users don't need all the websites, navigation trees, or folders, you can set all default permissions to  cross.

    Click 'OK'.
  2. Select the website for which you wish to set permissions. When clicking the action button 'more' you can click the option  'Change website permissions'. Set up permissions at website level. Permissions apply to the website itself and all underlying folders and items.
  3. Select the folder for which you wish to set permissions. When clicking the action button  'more' you can click the option  'Change folder permissions'. Set up permissions at folder level. Permissions apply to the folder itself and all underlying folders and items.
  4. Select the item for which you wish to set permissions. When clicking the action button  'more' you can click the option  'Change permissions'. Set up permissions at item level. Permissions only apply to the item itself


When setting permissions at an underlying level, any permissions set at an overlaying level are overruled.


When you are setting up a new user group after specific permissions are set for an item, folder or website, default settings at module level are applied to this item/folder/website for this specific group.


Example: You control four different websites with Sitebox. The webpage 'test' on the website 'Test.nl' needs to be updated periodically with new information. One of your employees is responsible for these updates and needs a Sitebox user account. This employee has no other activities within Sitebox. You want to apply permissions in a way that this employee can edit and publish this specific page. The employee needs no other permissions. You've already added the employee to a new user group called 'Testgroep'.


  1. 'Testgroep' needs the module 'Structure & pages', so you set a check-mark  under  'view' next to 'Testgroep' in the access permissions tab within the 'Module settings'. The header 'Website' has now been added to the access bar, and the module 'Structure & pages' is the only module in the header menu.
  2. While it's important for the employee to see the website 'Test.nl', they don't need to see the other three website you control. This is why you don't add any permissions to the 'Default permissions' tab within the 'Module settings'. Click 'Ok' and close the 'Module settings'.
  3. Select the website 'Test.nl'. When clicking the action button 'more' you can click the option  'Change website permissions'. Set a check-mark under  'view' next to 'Testgroep'. Click 'OK'. The employee will only see this website and the underlying folders within Sitebox, and not the other websites.
  4. You don't necessarily have to change anything at folder level, because you've set permissions at website level, and these apply to all underlying folders and items. The employee can now see the webpage 'Test', but they don't have the permissions to edit or publish this page yet.
  5. Select the webpage 'Test' and click 'more'. Choose 'Change permissions' in the drop-down menu. Set a check-mark  under 'edit' and under  'publish' next to 'Testgroep'. The check-mark under 'view' should already be there. Click 'OK'.



When you want the employee to only see the folders and webpages they need, you can set their permissions like this:


The folders the employee needs are already set up the right way, so you will need to revoke permission to see all unneeded folders.


Select a folder the employee doesn't need and click 'more'. Choose 'Change folder permissions' in the drop-down menu. Set a cross under  'view' next to 'Testgroep'. Click 'OK'. Repeat this step for all folders and underlaying folders the employee doesn't need.


The permissions for the webpage the employee needs are already set up the right way, so you will need to revoke permissions for all unneeded webpages within the folder.


Select the folder the webpage the employee needs is in, and select a webpage the employee doesn't need. Click 'more'. Choose 'Change permissions' in the drop-down menu. Set a cross under  'View' next to 'Testgroep'. Click 'OK'. Repeat this step for every webpage the employee doesn't need within the folder.


When the employee opens the module 'Structure & pages' they will only see this:




Applying permissions recursively

It's possible to apply permissions recursively. This means the permissions will be set for all underlaying levels forcibly. This will overwrite any deviating permissions on the underlying levels.


Applying permissions recursively is a way to reset deviating permissions in the underlaying levels to the default settings on the current level.


To apply permissions recursively you need permission to change permissions at the level you apply them. This means the following:


Example: You're an administrator and have permission to change permissions at the module level for the module 'Structure & pages'. However, the 'Super User' has revoked those permissions at website level for one of the webpages 'Test.nl':



When you apply your own permissions at module level recursively, all underlying levels will be overwritten. Now you 'do' have permission to change permissions for the website 'Test.nl':


Your permissions at module level overwrite your permissions on website level this way.


Pay attention when giving a user group permissions to change permissions, that they can always change permissions at the level you give them those permissions, but also all underlying levels. Even if you revoke that right on an underlying level.



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